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Welcome

January 2nd 2010 was the day that Oyster became accepted on almost all National Rail services in Greater London, making cashless pay-as-you-go a reality London-wide.  It should now be really simple, but in reality it is about as complicated as it could possibly be. There are three different fares structures depending on whether your route accepted Oyster before November 2009 or not, and if not whether your journey mixes National Rail and TfL rail and includes zone 1; while children sometimes travel free and sometimes have to pay.

This site has been set up to try and explain how the system works in an alternative fashion to the official TfL site.  It also exposes the alternative approach that families can take where Oyster is not the cheapest option. Plus I will highlight areas where the system is not working and list improvements that I feel need to be made.

The pages listed in the left sidebar allow you to navigate through the main information areas of the site.  Below this introduction is a latest news blog, which includes my own personal diary of experiences using Oyster cards with my family.  Please feel free to add comments to both blog posts and pages, especially if you spot something you think might be wrong.

Examples of Capping Scenarios

I’ve added a long awaited new page to the site explaining how capping works using real examples. You can find the page in the menu to the left, or here.

Wandsworth Town fares

A recent visitor queried why fares from Wandsworth Town to Southeastern destinations did not offer a zone 1 avoiding option via Clapham Junction and Peckham Rye when similar journeys from Putney did have the option.  I’ve queried this with TfL who were already aware of the anomaly and they have confirmed that it should be fixed with the May fares revision.  The issue dated back to 2010 when cash fares from Wandsworth Town did not exist avoiding Waterloo.

Gatwick Fares – A New Twist

A last minute change of mind saw the Thameslink/Southern off-peak fares for National Rail only services from Gatwick to and through zone 1 held at last years price of £8.30.  That’s good isn’t it? I hear you ask.  Well, yes and no.  The problem arises where you want to continue onto the Underground, or indeed if you want to avoid zone 1.  Once you mix the Underground into a journey involving zone 1, TL/SN add £2.40 to the fare being the zone 1 tube single.  But off-peak they are adding £2.60 because they thought the basic fare was going to be £8.50.  Hence Gatwick to Bank is £10.90 off-peak, but hang around at London Bridge for 20 minutes and you’ll be charged £8.30+£2.40 = £10.70.

Avoiding zone 1 is even worse.  After initially setting the fares greater than the via zone 1 equivalent in 2016, they matched them in 2017 so there was no benefit in avoiding zone 1 from Gatwick.  This year the avoiding zone 1 off-peak National Rail only fares have all gone up to £8.50, so we’re back to being charged more to avoid zone 1.  Clearly whoever decided to freeze the fare to zone 1 forgot to do the same to the avoiding zone 1 equivalents. And it gets more complicated because at peak times it is cheaper to avoid zone 1.  What a mess!

It should be noted that National Rail Enquiries states that the off-peak fare is £8.50 for Gatwick to London terminals, so GTR even forgot to update the definitive source of fare information for National Rail services.

So, until such time as the confusion gets sorted out, don’t avoid zone 1 if your off-peak journey to/from Gatwick can be made entirely with National Rail.  And if changing to the Underground at a terminal you will save money if you can wait 20 minutes after touching out before touching in at the Underground station.  Sadly the other way is more difficult because you have to wait 40 minutes before touching in to the National Rail platforms to split the journey in two.

Note: This article has been updated on 29th January with new information recieved from TfL.

Site Crashed by a YouTube Video

If you tried to access this site on Friday evening there is a fair chance that you found it unavailable.  This obviously wasn’t planned, but coincided with the release of a new video from Geoff Marshall (aka @geofftech).  With almost 100K followers of his YouTube channel, this site recieved an unprecedented spike in demand.  Thankfully all was fixed by the early hours of Saturday morning.  Want to know what the fuss was about?  Take a look, and subscribe to Geoff’s channel if you haven’t already.

2019 Fare Tables

We have today published our fare tables with the 2019 details. The caps and travelcards page has also been updated for next year. All pages can be found on the Fares Guide page. I am waiting on the zonal range data from TfL before being able to provide access to the fare finder for next year.

Bank (Walbrook) to Cannon Street OSIs

Now that the new entrance to Bank Station, within the Bloomberg building on Walbrook, has opened, TfL have added a new OSI between Bank and Cannon Street LU.  The OSI still works with any entrance to Bank station, but the Walbrook exit is far and away the nearest.  This entrance takes you down to the Waterloo and City line platforms and has access to the rest of the station from there.

The details have been added to my OSI list, and to the map page for Bank to Cannon Street.

Oyster Weekly Capping for Bus/Tram

The first stage of weekly capping on Oyster cards is almost here. From next Monday, 17th December, bus and tram fares will count towards a weekly as well as a daily cap. Just like contactless the weekly cap will apply to journeys made between Monday and Sunday. If you reach the bus and tram cap every day this means that on the 5th day you will be charged less as you will have reached the weekly bus and tram pass price, the same as the weekly cap.

Note: This only applies to blue adult Oyster cards. Concessions should continue to buy the weekly bus and tram pass to take advantage of the discounted rates.

At the moment rail fares (inc tube and dlr) will still only cap on a daily basis on Oyster. TfL hope to roll out the next stage in the spring of 2019.

The bus weekly capping was supposed to have started today, 10th October, but the problems caused by the recent O2 network outtage have necessitated a short delay.

Equipment Malfunctions

Obviously in a system as large as Oyster there are going to be occasional malfunctions.  Many of them, while annoying, will not have serious repercussions.  If a gate stops working it will usually be blocked out of use, but what happens if the error doesn’t affect the actual gate function?  I have become aware of three instances recently where Oyster data has been compromised in some way.

Back in the summer a single gate at London Bridge failed to update the date.  Anyone using PAYG exiting through that gate ended up with two incomplete journeys, one ending on the previous day and one starting at their origin on that day.  Read the rest of this entry »

New OSI at Tottenham Court Road

A new OSI was activated between gatelines at Tottenham Court Road towards the end of September.  There’s a 10 minute allowance either way.  The OSI List has been updated (including the change history).

Discontinued OSI at Mansion House

TfL have decided to remove the OSI between Cannon Street NR and Mansion House LU.  This was added some time ago when reconstruction work at Cannon Street resulted in closure of the LU station.  They say that analysis of journeys shows very few people use this OSI compared to the thousands using the NR-LU OSI at Cannon Street itself.  I’ve removed this OSI from the list here.

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